Tag: lent

“Think about not just the virtues that you will get for yourselves, but also the graces from fasting that will go into your home and family, your domestic churches. These graces will be there for your spouse and children. We are ultimately that vessel overflowing with God’s Graces and blessings onto others. While we may grow in virtue, our loved ones benefit also.” -Megan Schrieber

With Lent fast (get what I did there??) approaching, Becky gives Megan a shot in the arm and a kick in the bottom to up her fasting game. Historical evidence, Scripture, and early church father writings abound in this week’s episode. Lent has traditionally been known as the time when new believers prepared for Baptism. Baptism is the Sacrament in which all sin is washed away. Lent and Easter should be a time for us to renew our baptismal promises and to repent and be cleansed. An excerpt from an article copy-written by Rev. D.E. Hudson, C.S.C. states “Open the life of any saint or servant of God, and all of them, in their manifold variety of person and character and holiness, will be found to practice fasting as one of the principal means of their spiritual progress. Yes, the tradition and the practice endure to this day with the children of the Church, and will endure unto the end of time. But it is still true, nevertheless, that the spirit of penance has so far decreased, that a very large and, we fear, an increasing proportion of the faithful, from one cause or another, or without cause at all, fail to observe the law of fasting.”

Show Notes:

 

Call to Action – 

Make the effort to get to confession at the beginning of Lent, receive the font of Mercy and Grace. Start opening yourself up to the traditional call of The Church to fast this Lent. (as long as your health situation allows) Ask God to give you the Grace to follow His call on your life. Ask Him to guide you into your own personal conversion.

Scripture – 

14 Now after John was arrested, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of God, 15 and saying, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent, and believe in the gospel.” – Mark 1:14-15

Saint Quote – 

“What is fasting?” But that which is heavenly, both in meaning and substance? Fasting is the nourishment of the soul, and the food of the mind. Fasting is the life of the angels. Fasting is the death of sin, the destruction of guilt, the remedy of salvation, the source of grace, and the foundation of chastity. By this path God is more easily approached.” – St. Ambrose

 

 

Have you ever heard of this term, Lectio Divina, and wondered what in the world it meant? Have you ever thought you’d like to learn how to get into the Scriptures in a deeper way? God speaks to us through the Word of God and we are richly blessed in this country to have the freedom to have Bibles, read Bibles, live out our Catholic Christian faith, and to come together for times to worship and praise our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. As a Catholic, we are steeped in the traditions of proper interpretations of God’s Word and we have the Graces of the Church to help us in our journey. With Lent just around the corner, we thought it was the best time to finally get Sarah Christmyer on our podcast to help us learn how to go deeper into relationship with our Father through the written Word.

Our Guest:

 

Sarah Christmyer is a Catholic author, Bible teacher, and speaker with a special love for lectio divina and journaling as ways to draw close to Christ in Scripture. She co-developed with Jeff Cavins The Great Adventure Catholic Bible study program, serving as founding editor. Sarah is the author of two guided prayer journals, Create in me a Clean Heart: Ten Minutes a Day in the Penitential Psalms and Lord, Make Haste to Help Me: Seven Psalms to Pray in Time of Need. She  is author or co-author of a number of Bible studies for Ascension Press and Emmaus Road Publishing. She is a contributing author of Walk in Her Sandals: Experiencing Christ’s Passion Through the Eyes of Women, published by Ave Maria Press. Sarah has a Masters degree in Theology from St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, Philadelphia, where she is an adjunct faculty member. She is a member of the Board of Malvern Retreat House in Malvern, PA. She blogs at www.ComeIntotheWord.com and for Women in the New Evangelization (WINE).

Show Notes:

  • During Lent, Sarah is hosting a group discussion of the Penitential Psalms on Facebook so people can share their insights with others. Request to join by liking Sarah’s Author Page linked above. Then click on “Groups” in the left-hand menu.
  • Also, you can sign up for her blog at www.comeintotheword.com and you will receive free instructions related to things she is talking about:
    • – Planting the Word in Your Heart (lectio divina steps and personal journaling format)
    • – How to Pray with the Penitential Psalms

 

 Call to Action – 

Find the Bible that you will use as your own where you can underline and highlight the Scriptures that God is speaking blessing into your life with. Set up a special place that you can find quiet and commune with God as you meditate with the Penitential Psalms this Lent. If you are on Facebook, sign up for the group so we can all dig in deeper together. Ask the Lord to meet you in His Word daily and to give you the Grace to hear Him.

Scripture – 

“14 Since then we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. 15 For we have not a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sinning. 16 Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need” – Hebrews 4:14-16

Saint Quote – 

“Great is the profit to be derived from the sacred Scriptures and their assistance is sufficient for every need. Paul was pointing this out when he said, ‘Whatever things have been written have been written for our instruction, upon whom the final age of the world has come, that through the patience and the consolation afforded by the Scriptures we may have hope.’ (Rom. 15:4; 1 Cor. 10:11) The divine words, indeed, are a treasury containing every sort of remedy, so that, whether one needs to put down senseless pride, or to quench the fire of concupiscence or to trample on the love of riches, or to despise pain, or to cultivate cheerfulness and acquire patience – in them one may find in abundance the means to do so.”  (Hom. 37  On John.)”St. John Chrysostom

 

 

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